Tag Archives: GMWEA

A New Hampshire Operator’s Visit to Vermont

Looking at my blank computer screen now, I am wondering what I can say that would be different.  How can I describe my wastewater operator exchange experience in Vermont?

Before June of 2017, I had no idea this program existed — until my plant superintendent shared an e-mail from New Hampshire Dept. of Environmental Services, asking if we were interested in sending an operator. I corresponded with N.H. contact Mike Carle, and he got my name submitted as an alternate with Sean Greig.

Later, my exchange confirmed, Chris Robinson — water quality superintendent of Shelburne, Vermont — contacted me with a final itinerary for my visit, Nov. 6, 7, and 8, 2018.  Chris was also gracious enough to take me around to the plants on the second day of my tour.  He explained the processes these plants use and the type of work they do to avoid having a negative impact on the environment.  

The author, third from front on left, with co-conspirators at the DoubleTree Hotel in Burlington, Vermont, during his exchange.

The treatment plant tours, on the first two days, were very interesting. I was led through plants by operators with experience ranging from two months to over 30 years. In every case, they explained each step of their process with me and shared insights about how they keep things running — in some cases, while dealing with storm flows and equipment failures.

During my tour, I also spoke with lab techs at each plant, asking what types of tests they run and where they grab samples when they do checks on equipment. There was even time to look through the microscope on the Shelburne tour and talk about the installation of DO and ORP monitoring probes.

I was also lucky enough to meet a local farmer and ride along on a land application of treated liquid fertilizer fresh from the plant.

Spreader tank taking on biosolids for land application at the Essex Junction plant.

I discovered that plants use disk filters to polish effluent before it passes through UV lights for disinfection; operators explained that the filters help extend the service life between cleanings on light racks.

All of the plants running digesters were using the methane gas for heating and power generation, and some, coupled with solar, were able to greatly cut power costs.                    

Some plants were not set up for sludge thickening and have to truck the material to other plants to process.  The plant where I work is in the same situation, so our town is considering upgrades to add machinery that will eliminate trucking costs.  In the past, our facility was rarely used by haulers, but recently surrounding towns have set limits on daily amounts being accepted. Along with rate changes, this results in an increase in truck traffic.

My Vermont tour allowed me to ask people about maintenance issues with the septage receiving units, as I noticed we all share the same brand of equipment. There are so many different thoughts on septage; some plants are able to handle the loads better, while others are limited in capacity.

I spent my final day at GMWEA’s trade show, where I was able to meet with sales reps and get information on all of the newest technology for treatment plants. The event  also included trainings for operators; I went to the morning Basic Math class and was pleasantly surprised at how much information they got across in an hour, with a very good instructor who understood how to keep it simple. Later, I sat in on the polymer course, and I was pleased to walk away with useful information that I can share with coworkers.

If I had to pick out one thing that stuck with me from the exchange program, it’s how well every one worked together between the different towns and operators.  You get the sense that everyone is working toward the same goal: protecting the environment and producing skilled professional operators.

As operators we need to take time to thank groups like Green Mountain Water, who are willing to invest in us.  Consider signing up and being a part of something that can make a difference!

Submitted by Ernie Smalley

Year of the Waynes

Congratulations to Wayne Elliott and Wayne Graham!!  Both were honored at the New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA) Awards Banquet in January, held at the Marriott Copley Place in Boston. The awards were presented in recognition of their dedication and contributions to the wastewater industry.

Left to right: Wayne Graham, Chris Robinson, and Wayne Elliott

Wayne Elliott, principal at Aldrich & Elliott,  Essex Junction, Vermont, received the 2018 Alfred E. Peloquin award.  This award is given annually to an individual who has shown a high level of interest and performance in wastewater operations and who has made a significant contribution to the wastewater field in such areas as improvements to the environment, cost effective plant operations, public relations, innovative process controls, industrial pre-treatment, training, Association contributions and related activities.

Wayne Graham, wastewater specialist at Vermont Rural Water Association, also based in Essex Junction, Vermont, received the 2018 Operator award.  This award is given annually to an individual who has shown a high interest and performance in wastewater operations and has made a significant contribution to the wastewater field.

If you happen to know someone who is deserving of either of these awards, please contact your NEWEA State Director, Chris Robinson, at crobinson@shelburnevt.org.  Nominations close on June 1st.

Contributed by Chris Robinson, GMWEA board member, NEWEA state representative, and water quality superintendent of the Town of Shelburne. Photos by Shannon Robinson.

To return to GMWEA’s website, CLICK HERE.

Lake Champlain Aboard the Melosira

Written by Tom DiPietro. Photos courtesy of James Sherrard.

The skies threatened rain, but that did not dampen spirits aboard the Melosira, the University of Vermont’s Lake Champlain research vessel. It was on this cool September afternoon that over a dozen GMWEA members joined UVM Sea Grant staff aboard the vessel for a tour of Lake Champlain. It was a scenic tour — but one with a focus on water quality monitoring and management.

The tour set off near the ECHO Center in Burlington, made a stop above the effluent pipe from the Burlington Main plant, and then headed north to the mouth of the Winooski River before returning to shore. During the tour, GMWEA members learned about some of the sampling conducted as part of research conducted by UVM and Sea Grant. The Melosira’s crew demonstrated use of their CTD (Conductivity Temperature and Depth) meter near the Burlington plant’s effluent pipe and then again at the mouth of the Winooski river. This instrument collects valuable water quality data for researchers as they continually assess lake conditions.

(Left: The CTD meter used by researchers aboard the Melosira.)

In between stops and sampling, UVM Sea Grant staff shared their on-going research efforts with the group. This included discussions on “data buoys” located throughout the lake, phosphorous pollution and blue-green algae, lake sturgeon migration, microplastics in the water column, and the impacts of road salt on the lake.

Also aboard was Joel Banner Baird, a staff writer for the Burlington Free Press. Joel had the opportunity to engage with GMWEA members and also learn a little more about the lake. In the article that he prepared for the Burlington Free Press he recapped, “Lake Champlain is much more vulnerable to terrestrial pollution than are the Great Lakes… The land area that drains into Lake Champlain, measured against the lake itself, is huge compared to the ratio of watershed to water of the Great Lakes. That unusually high ratio means that the consequences of what happens upstream can add up quickly.”

(Above photo: GMWEA members Karen Adams, Chelsea Mandingo, and Tom DiPietro aboard the Melosira.)

The entire article can be found here: http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/2017/09/09/lake-scientists-launch-lesson-plan-landlubbers/636864001/

The event was well received and the attendees are looking forward to a similar event next year. Special thanks to the Melosira crew, Kris Stepenuck and the rest of Sea Grant team for organizing the event.

If you were also aboard the Melosira, or are interested in Lake Champlain and its waters, please leave a comment on this post!

To return to the GMWEA website, click here: www.gmwea.org