Tag Archives: Essex Junction

The Best in the Business!

The nominations came in, the panels convened, and deliberations were duly made. On May 23, 2019, at GMWEA’s annual Spring Member Meeting and Conference, 10 awards were presented to individuals and facilities for their exceptional service in water quality fields in 2018 — or, in one case, a lifetime.

We congratulate the awardees and thank them for their commitment to protecting public health and Vermont’s beautiful environment!

Ashleigh Belrose, above, operator at South Burlington’s Airport Parkway WRRF, won the Bob Wood Young Professionals Award, given to a young professional operator or engineer (30 or under) who has achieved notable contributions to the water environment, water or wastewater operations, and/or to GMWEA.

Rod Munroe, lab director, City of Rutland Wastewater, received the Andrew D. Fish Laboratory Excellence Award, presented for outstanding activity in laboratory performance at work, community service, education, committee participation, or other outstanding contribution.

Chelsea Mandigo, stormwater coordinator/operator, Village of Essex Junction, won the Stormwater Award, presented for outstanding performance in stormwater management and/or education, and significant contribution to the stormwater field.​

Peter Krolczyk, operator, Town of Waterbury, was presented with the Operator Excellence – Wastewater award, given for outstanding performance in system maintenance, protecting public health, and achievement beyond normal responsibilities.

John Tymecki, operator, Champlain Water District, won the Michael J. Garofano Water Operator of the Year Award, presented for outstanding performance in system maintenance, protecting public health, and achievement beyond normal responsibilities.

(Above) The Town Of Ludlow WWTF won the Facility Excellence Award, Wastewater, given annually for outstanding facilities exceeding system operation requirements. Recognition is for the entire facility and staff.

Jim Fay, general manager (retiring!) of Champlain Water District, was presented with GMWEA’s prestigious Founder’s Award, given to individuals for significant contributions to the water quality professions and GMWEA during a lifetime of service.

Chris Cox, chief operator at Montpelier WRRF, received the 2019 President’s Award, presented to water quality professionals demonstrating exceptional achievement in their fields and service on behalf of Green Mountain Water Environment Association’s mission.

Kevin Corliss, operator at Drew’s All Naturals, LLC, in Chester, received the Outstanding Industrial Operator Award, presented for significant accomplishments in operation, problem solving, crisis management, training, or understanding of industrial wastewater issues.

Global Foundries WWTF, Essex Junction, received the Outstanding Industrial Facility Award, given for demonstrated commitment to clean water and pollution prevention, including implementation of water or wastewater treatment changes to address problems common to similar industries.

To return to GWMEA’s website, click here.

A New Hampshire Operator’s Visit to Vermont

Looking at my blank computer screen now, I am wondering what I can say that would be different.  How can I describe my wastewater operator exchange experience in Vermont?

Before June of 2017, I had no idea this program existed — until my plant superintendent shared an e-mail from New Hampshire Dept. of Environmental Services, asking if we were interested in sending an operator. I corresponded with N.H. contact Mike Carle, and he got my name submitted as an alternate with Sean Greig.

Later, my exchange confirmed, Chris Robinson — water quality superintendent of Shelburne, Vermont — contacted me with a final itinerary for my visit, Nov. 6, 7, and 8, 2018.  Chris was also gracious enough to take me around to the plants on the second day of my tour.  He explained the processes these plants use and the type of work they do to avoid having a negative impact on the environment.  

The author, third from front on left, with co-conspirators at the DoubleTree Hotel in Burlington, Vermont, during his exchange.

The treatment plant tours, on the first two days, were very interesting. I was led through plants by operators with experience ranging from two months to over 30 years. In every case, they explained each step of their process with me and shared insights about how they keep things running — in some cases, while dealing with storm flows and equipment failures.

During my tour, I also spoke with lab techs at each plant, asking what types of tests they run and where they grab samples when they do checks on equipment. There was even time to look through the microscope on the Shelburne tour and talk about the installation of DO and ORP monitoring probes.

I was also lucky enough to meet a local farmer and ride along on a land application of treated liquid fertilizer fresh from the plant.

Spreader tank taking on biosolids for land application at the Essex Junction plant.

I discovered that plants use disk filters to polish effluent before it passes through UV lights for disinfection; operators explained that the filters help extend the service life between cleanings on light racks.

All of the plants running digesters were using the methane gas for heating and power generation, and some, coupled with solar, were able to greatly cut power costs.                    

Some plants were not set up for sludge thickening and have to truck the material to other plants to process.  The plant where I work is in the same situation, so our town is considering upgrades to add machinery that will eliminate trucking costs.  In the past, our facility was rarely used by haulers, but recently surrounding towns have set limits on daily amounts being accepted. Along with rate changes, this results in an increase in truck traffic.

My Vermont tour allowed me to ask people about maintenance issues with the septage receiving units, as I noticed we all share the same brand of equipment. There are so many different thoughts on septage; some plants are able to handle the loads better, while others are limited in capacity.

I spent my final day at GMWEA’s trade show, where I was able to meet with sales reps and get information on all of the newest technology for treatment plants. The event  also included trainings for operators; I went to the morning Basic Math class and was pleasantly surprised at how much information they got across in an hour, with a very good instructor who understood how to keep it simple. Later, I sat in on the polymer course, and I was pleased to walk away with useful information that I can share with coworkers.

If I had to pick out one thing that stuck with me from the exchange program, it’s how well every one worked together between the different towns and operators.  You get the sense that everyone is working toward the same goal: protecting the environment and producing skilled professional operators.

As operators we need to take time to thank groups like Green Mountain Water, who are willing to invest in us.  Consider signing up and being a part of something that can make a difference!

Submitted by Ernie Smalley

Seven Facts About Water Quality Day 2018

Here’s what you need to know about Water Quality Day, August 3:

1. It has been proclaimed annually by every Vermont governor since 2014 because they feel it’s important for Vermonters to recognize the importance of “working water.”

2. Safe drinking water and clean rivers and lakes don’t just happen. We – the citizens – pollute our water resources with every flush, every load of laundry, every car wash, and that pollution needs to be removed if our natural waters are to stay healthy for people, plants, and animals.

3. We couldn’t live the way we do if our drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater treatment systems – all that equipment and high-tech, operated by skilled professionals – didn’t do their job.

4. They DO do their job 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Water quality professionals work hard and with deep commitment because they know we can’t live without clean water.

5. On August 2nd in the City of Burlington, August 3rd elsewhere in Vermont, you can learn more about this amazing, mostly out of sight, publicly-owned infrastructure. We invite you to come to any of the tours/open houses on August 2nd and 3rd to check it out. Tours are FUN, surprising, and educational for people of all ages, and there will be snacks and souvenirs at all locations. 

6. This year GMWEA is coordinating Water Quality Day with the Vermont Dept. of Environmental Conservation’s Clean Water Week. The week features scores of activities, statewide, celebrating our natural waters and the community organizations that protect them. Check them all out at http://dec.vermont.gov/watershed/cwi/clean-water-week .

7. Tours of water, wastewater, or stormwater plants will be offered at the the following:

AUGUST 2

  • Burlington Stormwater: Meet at ECHO Center! Tours start at 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
  • Burlington Drinking Water: 235 Penny Lane. Tours at 9:45 and 2:15.
  • Burlington Wastewater: 53 Lavalley Lane. Tours at 11:00 and 1:00.

For more information on Burlington tours, contact water-resources@burlingtonvt.gov, (802) 863-4501.

AUGUST 3

  • Essex Junction Wastewater: 39 Cascade St.  Tours at 9:30, 11:00, and 1:00. For more information, contact: jim@essexjunction.org, (802) 878-6943 ext. 101.
  • Hinesburg Drinking Water: 149 Shelburne Falls Rd. Tours at 10:00 and 2:00. Contact: ebailey@hinesburg.org, (802)482-6097.
  • Middlebury Wastewater: 243 Industrial Ave.  Open house 8:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Contact bwells@townofmiddlbury.org. (802) 388-6514.
  • Montpelier Wastewater: 949 Dog River Rd. Tours at 10:00 and 2:00. Contact: ccox@montpelier-vt.org, (802)223-9511.
  • South Burlington Wastewater: 1015 Airport Parkway.  Tours at 8:00 and 12 noon. Contact: bob.fischer@gmwea.org, (802) 658-7964.
  • South Burlington Stormwater: Farrell Park, Farrell Street. Tours at 9:30 and 1:30.  Contact: tom.dipietro@sburl.com. (802) 658-7961.
  • Champlain Water District (South Burlington): 403 Queen City Park Rd.  Tours at 11:00 and 3:00. Contact: mike.barsotti@champlainwater.org. (802) 864-7454.

See you there!

To return to GMWEA’s website, click here: www.gmwea.org .

Who’s the Best in the Business?

Every year, GMWEA honors operators, facilities, organizations, and companies that have demonstrated exceptional service to Vermont’s water quality industry.  The 2017 awards were presented by outgoing president Rick Kenney at our 2018 Spring Meeting & Conference at the Killington Grand Hotel and Conference Center.

We’d love to publish all the winners’ photos, but due to space limitations, we need to select just a few.  Nevertheless,  congratulations to every one of the awardees, who are truly the best in the business!

  • Michael Garofono Water Operator Excellence: George Donovan, operator, Fair Haven Water Dept. (see photo, right); Mike Barsotti, director of water quality and production, Champlain Water District
  • Operator Excellence, Wastewater: Timothy Kingston, operator, Town of Brandon
  • Facility Excellence Award, Water: Grand Isle Consolidated Water District (SOS)
  • Facility Excellence Award, Wastewater: Town of Richford WWTF
  • Andrew D. Fish Laboratory Excellence Award: Mike Swindell, operator, City of Burlington Main Wastewater Plant
  • Outstanding Industrial Operator Award: Gary Audy, contract chief operator for The Alchemist Brewery, Trapp Lager Brewery, and Swan Valley Cheese (see photo, right) 
  • Bob Wood Young Professional Award: Nick Giannetti, Vermont DEC Wastewater Management Program
  • Stormwater Award (Individual): Annie Costandi, stormwater coordinator, Essex Town (see photo, right)
  • Corporate Sponsor Award: Clean Waters, Inc.
  • Outstanding Industrial Facility Award: Stone Corral Brewery, Richmond
  • Elizabeth A. Walker Meritorious Service Award: Mark Simon, principal, Simon Operation Services (posthumous)(see photo, below)

  • GMWEA President’s Award: Eileen Toomey, customer service specialist, Endyne Labs; Town of Hartford 

Two Vermont facilities and one individual also won U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awards, which were presented by NEWEA’s Ray Vermette:

  • U.S. EPA Operations & Mantenance Award: Town of Milton
  • U.S. EPA Operator of the Year Award: Nate Lavallee, chief operator, Burlington North and East Plants​
  • U.S. EPA Energy Efficiency Award: Village of Essex Junction

Who do you think deserves recognition? GMWEA award winners are considered based on nominations received from our membership!  We invite you to put forward names of colleagues, facilities, or organizations you think have made exceptional contributions to the industry.

To return to the GMWEA website, click here.